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Tetraneuris acaulis.  Synonyms: Hymenoxys acaulis.
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills to sub-alpine. Openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, June 7, 2008.

Tetraneuris acaulis

Tetraneuris acaulis. Synonyms: Hymenoxys acaulis.
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills to sub-alpine. Openings. Summer. Lone Mesa State Park, June 7, 2008.

Tetraneuris acaulis is short, lovely, and uncommon in the Four Corners area. Stems have no leaves, varying amounts of hair, and often grow in quite noticeable clumps. The plant prefers dry open areas; those shown on this page are growing in Mancos Shale.

Edward Greene named this genus in 1898.  "Tetraneuris" is Greek for "four nerves" and "acaulis" means "without leaves on the stem".

This species was first collected for science by Bradbury in North Dakota and Pursh named it Galardia acaulis in 1814. It has endured dozens of other names. There are at least four varieties of T. acaulis and the names are ascribed to a number of different authors.

Tetraneuris acaulis

Tetraneuris acaulis

Tetraneuris acaulis. Synonyms: Hymenoxys acaulis.
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills to sub-alpine. Openings. Summer. Lone Mesa State Park, June 7, 2008 and June 4, 2011.

Notice what a great difference there is between the width and length of the yellow ray flowers on the bud at far left and the ray flowers on the fully mature flower heads. Many members of the Sunflower Family show this contrast. Descriptions of plants almost always give you the characteristics of the mature flower.

The second photo at left shows the vary hairy buds tucked tightly into the leaves.  Notice also the scattered hairs on the leaf surface.

Tetraneuris acaulis

Tetraneuris acaulis. Synonyms: Hymenoxys acaulis.
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills to sub-alpine. Openings. Summer. Lone Mesa State Park, June 7, 2008.

The notched petals and the over-lapping rows of hairy and broad phyllaries are distinguishing characteristics.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Tetraneuris acaulis