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    There are nearly a dozen Physarias (Bladderpods) in the Four Corners area; Physaria acutifolia is the most common. The genus was named by Asa Gray in 1848 and is now greatly expanded with the addition of all former members of the Lesquerella genus. "Physaria" is Greek for "bladder".  

     Click for more Physaria.

Physaria pulvinata
Physaria pulvinata (Bladderpod)
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, June 11, 2008.

This lovely, rare plant is found only in Dolores and San Miguel Counties, Colorado.  It forms symmetrical mounds of narrow, spotted leaves on Mancos Shale and in early summer blooms profusely. (The leaves in the back right are those of Tetraneuris acaulis.) 

The plant was named and described by Steve O'Kane and James Reveal in 2006.  "Pulvinata" means "cushion".

Physaria pulvinata. (Bladderpod)
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, June 11, 2008.

Physaria pulvinata. (Bladderpod)
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, June 24, 2008.

Physaria pulvinata
Physaria pulvinata. (Bladderpod)
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, June 11, 2008.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Physaria pulvinata