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More Hymenoxys photographs

Hymenoxys hoopesii
Dugaldia hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesiiSynonyms: Dugaldia hoopesii, Helenium hoopesii. (Orange Sneezeweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows. Summer.
Above: Navajo Lake Trail, August 6, 2014.
Left: Lower Calico Trail, June 16, 2004.

From early to late summer, showy Hymenoxys hoopesii plants are common, sometimes scattered in open woods, sometimes abundant in moist meadows from middle to high altitudes. They are always a pleasant sunny face to see along the trail, and are easily recognized by their mound of disk flowers; drooping, narrow, openly-spaced yellow/orange ray flowers; and deeply veined, almost white rib in the leaf.

Asa Gray named this plant Helenium hoopesii in 1864, Per Axel Rydberg renamed it Dugaldia hoopesii in 1900, and the Synthesis of the North American Flora accepts the name Hymenoxys hoopesii given by Bierner in 1994.  The type specimen is variously attributed to Hoopes or to Hall and Harbour, both in 1862. Since Gray gave the plant the specific epithet of "hoopesii", I think it is safe to go with Thomas Hoopes as the recognized first collector.

The genus name, Hymenoxys, is from the Greek for "membrane" and "sharp", apparently alluding in some way to the pappus.  

The genus name, Dugaldia, honors Dugald Stewart, 18th century Scottish philosopher.  Thomas Hoopes, 1834-1925, was a prospector, explorer, and seed collector in Colorado for a few years in his twenties until he returned to his Chester, Pennsylvania farming and a very successful wheelwright business.  (More biographical information about Dugald Stewart.)  (More biographical information about Thomas Hoopes.)

Dugaldia hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesiiSynonyms: Dugaldia hoopesii, Helenium hoopesii. (Orange Sneezeweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows. Summer.
Lower Calico Trail, June 16, 2004.

Hymenoxys hoopesii leaves are three-to-six inches long, with almost parallel veins and a wide, almost white central vein.

Dugaldia hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesiiSynonyms: Dugaldia hoopesii, Helenium hoopesii. (Orange Sneezeweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows. Summer.
Horse Creek Trail, June 6, 2004.
Grand Mesa, July 11, 2017.

Look at all four flowerheads in the top photograph at left and notice the variation in color and length of the ray flowers. This variation is due to the age of the flowerhead. The largest flowerhead is mature and the one just below it is the youngest of the four. The variation in size and color is not only typical of Hymenoxys hoopesii flowerheads but also of many other Asteraceae flowerheads.

Flower color can also vary with location. The second photograph at left was taken on Grand Mesa, about 100 miles north of the location that most other photographs on this page were taken. Grand Mesa Hymenoxys hoopesii often have deeper orange to red disc flowers and more orange tinted ray flowers.

Dugaldia hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesiiSynonyms: Dugaldia hoopesii, Helenium hoopesii. (Orange Sneezeweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows. Summer.
Navajo Lake Trail, July 6, 2004.

Dugaldia hoopesii

Hymenoxys hoopesiiSynonyms: Dugaldia hoopesii, Helenium hoopesii. (Orange Sneezeweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows. Summer.
Colorado Trail above Roaring Fork, September 23, 2008.

Fall brings its own beauty of drooping ray flowers.

More Hymenoxys photographs.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Hymenoxys hoopesii