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Trautvetteria caroliniensis
Trautvetteria caroliniensis variety occidentalis (Tasselrue, False Bugbane)
Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)

Montane. Streamsides. Summer.
Opal Lake Trail, July 10, 2010.

Trautvetteria caroliniensis grows to a height of forty inches in wet areas, usually streamsides.  It produces huge basal leaves and an abundance of attractive white flowers.  Here it is shown growing in the deep shade of Alnus incana along the stream flowing out of Opal Lake.

The genus "Trautvetteria" was named by Friedrich Fischer and Carl Meyer in 1835 for the Russian botanist and Professor, Ernst Trautvetter. The European species, Trautvetteria palmata was the first species in this genus.

The American species of this genus, Trautvetteria caroliniensis, was first named Hydrastis caroliniensis by Walter in 1788 and was renamed by Anna Vail in 1890 from a collection made by A. H. Curtiss on grassy balds of Roan Mountain, North Carolina, probably in 1882.  (Click for more biographical information about Trautvetter.)

Trautvetteria caroliniensis

Trautvetteria caroliniensis variety occidentalis (Tasselrue, False Bugbane)
Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)

Montane. Streamsides. Summer.
Opal Lake Trail, July 10, 2010.

Trautvetteria caroliniensis

Trautvetteria caroliniensis variety occidentalis (Tasselrue, False Bugbane)
Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)

Montane. Streamsides. Summer.
Opal Lake Trail, July 10, 2010.

Most leaves are long-petioled and basal. These basal leaves grow from four-to-twelve inches in diameter; the one or two stem leaves are smaller.  Shown here is a ten inch basal leaf.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Trautvetteria caroliniensis

Range map for Trautvetteria caroliniensis