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Townsendia annua
Townsendia annua
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Woodlands, openings. Spring.
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, April 27, 2007. 

Townsendia glabella

Townsendia glabella

Townsendia glabella
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills. Woodlands, openings. Spring.
Mesa Verde National Park, April 26, 2007.

Townsendia incana
Townsendia incana (Easter Daisy)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Woodlands, openings. Spring.
Top of Yellow Jacket Canyon, Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, April 4, 2007.

The rose-purple tinge of the phyllaries is sometimes not present and at other times is even more extensive and obvious than shown in this photo, but other Townsendia can also have this coloring.  The hairiness of the phyllaries and tufts of hair at their tips can be a distinguishing factor among the Townsendia species, but, again, these characteristics vary and are shared by a number of Townsendia.  This photograph shows three different length phyllaries.  Some Townsendia have only one rank of phyllaries, some have up to seven.

Townsendia incana

Townsendia incana

Townsendia incana (Easter Daisy)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Woodlands, openings. Spring.
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, May 13, 2004 and May 12, 2011.

The common name "Easter Daisy" was given, we can conjecture, because someone saw the plant blooming at Easter, but its dates of blooming depend, of course, on spring rains, altitude, etc., not on the advent of Easter which varies with the coming of the full moon.  This is another example of the problem with common names.  

The plant is commonly found in bloom from March through June.  I have also found Townsendia incana blooming in the fall and early winter, as late as December.

In the second photograph, notice the commonly occurring tinges of pink.

Townsendia incana
Townsendia incana (Easter Daisy)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Woodlands, openings. Spring.
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, May 17, 2009.

Flowers have been pollinated, seeds have matured, and silvery pappus hairs are ready to carry the brown seeds on the first strong winds  --  even while more flowers on the same plant are just opening.