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Oenothera pallida

Oenothera pallida

Oenothera pallida
Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills.  Disturbed areas, openings, sand. Spring, summer.
Hunter Canyon, Utah, May 3, 2005 and (above) Corona/Bow Tie Arches Trail, Utah, April 16, 2014 and Canyonlands National Park, Utah, April 24, 2014.

Oenothera pallida
Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills.  Disturbed areas, openings, sand. Spring, summer.
Hunter Canyon, Utah, May 3, 2005.

Oenothera pallida often covers extensive open areas with its long red arching stems, large white flowers, and pink dried flowers.  Notice that although most stems are red (and somewhat fleshy) there are white woody stems at the base of several plants.  Also see the woody stems in the next photographs.

Oenothera pallida

          Oenothera pallida

Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Shrublands, openings. Spring, summer.
Burr Trail, Utah, October 22, 2007.

Although Oenothera pallida is most commonly fleshy, it can be  woody, shrub-like, and over several feet wide and a foot tall as these photographs indicate.

 

Oenothera pallida
Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills.  Disturbed areas, openings, sand. Spring, summer.
Burr Trail, Utah, October 22, 2007.

Lines of new plants arise from the spreading roots of a nearby plant.  Such plants are said to be "rhizomatous", i.e., arising from horizontal underground root-like structures that sprout new plants from their nodes.

Oenothera pallida
Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Shrublands, openings. Spring, summer.
Burr Trail, Utah, October 22, 2007.

In the lower left corner a seed capsule matures, just above it a bud is ready to open, and the flower has just opened.  The yellow/green anther sacks of the flower stand high above the four yellow/green style legs, one of which can be clearly seen at the seven o'clock position, looking like an octopus leg.

 

Oenothera pallida
Oenothera pallida (Pale Evening Primrose)
Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Shrublands, openings. Spring, summer.
Butler Wash, Utah, April 7, 2005.

Lovely flowers eventually give way to seed capsules and minute seeds; each seed is about 1.5 millimeters long.  The seeds shown here are immature; they will soon dry, darken, and often gain spots.