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The genus "Ipomopsis" was named by Andre Michaux (1746-1802) and was published posthumously in 1803, probably by his son Francois Michaux (1770-1855).  "Ipomopsis" means "resembling the genus Ipomoea", Morning Glories.

Ipomopsis polycladon
Ipomopsis polycladonSynonym: Gilia polycladon.  (Spreading Gilia)
Polemoniaceae (Phlox Family)

Semi-desert. Sandy openings. Spring.
Corona/Bow Tie Arches Trail, April 17, 2014.

Ipomopsis polycladon is so slenderly spider-like that it is very easy to overlook. The plant pictured at left (and below) is not only very young but it is growing in a hot, dry location so it is even more diminutive and harder to see as one walks past it on the trail.

Ipomopsis polycladon

Ipomopsis polycladon

Ipomopsis polycladonSynonym: Gilia polycladon.  (Spreading Gilia)
Polemoniaceae (Phlox Family)

Semi-desert. Sandy openings. Spring.
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, April 21, 2016 and
Corona/Bow Tie Arches Trail, April 17, 2014.

The plants pictured at left are very young and only an inch or two tall. Leaves are coarsely toothed and often mucronate (tipped with a short, sharp, abrupt tip). Basal leaf clusters will spread as the plants age. Stems are light red and hairy and the root (projecting downward) is as thick as the stems. 

 
Ipomopsis polycladon
Ipomopsis polycladonSynonym: Gilia polycladon.  (Spreading Gilia)
Polemoniaceae (Phlox Family)

Semi-desert. Sandy openings. Spring.
Corona/Bow Tie Arches Trail, April 17, 2014.

Flowers emerge from swollen, sharply red-pointed calyces and eventually protrude several millimeters. Anthers just barely protrude from the floral tube and are just about even with the lobes of the flower.