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Hymenopappus newberryi
Hymenopappus newberryi
Hymenopappus newberryi
Hymenopappus newberryi (Wild Cosmos)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Above: Wildcat Canyon Trail, August 17, 2017 and July 12, 2010.
Left: August 15, 2007.

Hymenopappus newberryi enjoys open, sunny mountain hillsides, often, as in this case, hot, south-facing hillsides.  H. newberryi typically grows at the bottom of these hillsides so it receives good moisture draining from above.  Plants grow from eight to twenty-four inches tall with a basal rosette of finely cut leaves about five inches high and ten inches in diameter.  One-to-five stem leaves are quite short and as finely cut as the basal leaves.  (One stem leaf is visible on the right side of the main tan stem at the nine inch mark of the ruler and is blown up here.)  Hymenopappus newberryi

The finely cut leaves are similar to those of Hymenopappus filifolius

Hymenopappus newberryi occurs only in a few counties of Colorado and New Mexico.  It is found nowhere else in the world.

Asa Gray named this species Leucampyx newberryi in 1874 and M. Johnston renamed it Hymenopappus newberryi in 1923.  John Strong Newberry (1822-1892) was an American physician, professor, geologist, paleontologist, and botanist.  (Click for more biographical information about Newberry.)  

"Hymenopappus" refers to the membranous, scale-like pappus

Hymenopappus newberryi
Hymenopappus newberryi (Wild Cosmos)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Wildcat Canyon Trail, August 15, 2007.

Hymenopappus newberryi

Hymenopappus newberryi

Hymenopappus newberryi (Wild Cosmos)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Wildcat Canyon Trail, August 15, 2007.

Bright white petals open widely exposing the numerous tiny yellow disk flowers.

Green phyllaries are broad, in a single row, and hairy.

Hymenopappus newberryi (Wild Cosmos)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane. Openings. Summer.
Wildcat Trail, August 15, 2007.

In Asteraceae, the "pappus" is the modified calyx, made of hairs, bristles, or scales that are attached at the apex of the achene (the sunflower seed).  In the Hymenopappus genus the pappus usually consists of short, membrane-like scales.   Hymenopappus newberryi can have no pappus  (as in this photograph) or it can have a minute pappus of .01-.1 millimeter.

The photograph shows two complete disk flowers, the left one fully open, and the right one in bud.  Each of the flowers, including the seed, is about five millimeters.  The pappus would be attached at the top of the white portion which is the achene, the seed.  

The tiny, glistening dots (visible especially at the bottom of the right bud where it is constricted) are minute glandular hairs.  

The pink background is my finger.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Hymenopappus newberryi