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Echinocereus fendleri
Echinocereus fendleri
Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Semi-desert. Woodlands, grasslands, openings. Summer.
Angel Peak National Recreation Area, New Mexico, June 3, 2010.

Echinocereus stems are ridged, the areoles do not have glochids, and the flowers are borne below the apex of the stem.   E. fendleri usually has one central spine (white or dark) and four-to-ten radial spines (usually white with a dark stipe on the under-side).

Echinocereus fendleri

Echinocereus fendleri
Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Semi-desert. Woodlands, grasslands, openings. Summer.
Angel Peak National Recreation Area, New Mexico, June 3, 2010.

This species was first named Cereus fendleri by Engelmann in 1849 and was renamed Echinocereus fendleri in 1860 by Sencke.  The specific epithet honors lifetime plant collector Augustus Fendler.  (Click for more biographical information.)

"Echinos" is Greek for "Hedgehog" (a critter similar to a Porcupine) and "cereus" is Latin for "candle" or "waxy".

 

Echinocereus fendleri
Echinocereus fendleri
Cactaceae (Cactus Family)

Semi-desert. Woodlands, grasslands, openings. Summer.
Angel Peak National Recreation Area, New Mexico, June 3, 2010.

Masses of twisted filaments support light yellow anthers and pollen that surround the green sticky stigma.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Echinocereus fendleri

Range map for Echinocereus fendleri

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