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Arctostaphylos patula
Arctostaphylos patula
Arctostaphylos patula (Manzanita)
Ericaceae (Heath Family)

Desert, semi-desert. Woodlands, shrublands. Spring.
Upper Mule Canyon, Utah, April 8, 2005.

Manzanita is lovely year-round: It is often evergreen in winter snows and its gray and rich brown-red bark are distinctive and beautiful all year.  In the spring, drooping clusters of flowers often engulf the bush in pink and white.  The late summer green, white, or brown berries attract a wide variety of animals including bears for whom the genus, "arcto", is named. Manzanita can vegetatively spread over very large areas forming dense thickets, especially under Ponderosa Pines and in meadows. 

"Arcto" is Greek for "bear" and "staphylos" is Greek for "a bunch of grapes".  "Patula" is Latin for "spreading".

Arctostaphylos patula (Manzanita)
Ericaceae (Heath Family)

Desert, semi-desert. Canyons, woodlands. Spring.
Upper Mule Canyon, Utah, April 8, 2005.

The nearly vertical position of the leaves, their thick, leathery texture, the reddish-brown bark splitting with age and showing gray, and the innumerable clusters of drooping flowers are all hallmarks of Arctostaphylos.

Arctostaphylos patula (Manzanita)
Ericaceae (Heath Family)

Desert, semi-desert. Canyons, woodlands. Spring.
Upper Mule Canyon, Utah, October 23, 2006.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Arctostaphylos patula