WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE      SEARCH BY PLANT NAME     BLUE/PURPLE FLOWERS      CONTACT US



Poliomintha incana
Poliomintha incana
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Semi-desert.  Sands.  Spring.
East of Bluff, Utah, May 3, 2007.

These scraggly, aromatic shrubs, our only shrubby Mint, grow to about three feet tall and broad and are often found by the dozens -- once located.  They are a high desert, semi-desert shrub found in several counties in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah and in only Montezuma County in Colorado.  

This species was at first named Hedeoma incana by John Torrey in 1858 from a specimen collected by Charles Wright and John Bigelow near El Paso, Texas on the Mexican Boundary Survey, probably in 1851-1852.  Asa Gray renamed the plant Poliomintha incana in 1870.  "Polio" is Greek for the color "gray". "Incana" is Latin for the color "gray".

Poliomintha incana
Poliomintha incana
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Semi-desert.  Sands.  Spring.
East of Bluff, Utah, May 3, 2007.

Flowers are a very light lavender-white but appear to be more purple because of the color of the calyx.  The gray hairiness of the calyx gives rise to the name of this plant.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Poliomintha incana